Bruno Giacosa Le Rocche del Falletto di Serralunga d'Alba Barolo Nebbiolo 1998

Ratings on Delectable

boyd pearson Delectable Pro

Beautiful and elegant.

Beautiful and elegant.

9.4

Mike R Delectable Pro

3L and man can this canary sign - what a wonderful wine - next we do s'mores to augment the wine - lol Big damn smiles tonight - In fact my face hurts from smiling but wine does ease the pain / lol

3L and man can this canary sign - what a wonderful wine - next we do s'mores to augment the wine - lol Big damn smiles tonight - In fact my face hurts from smiling but wine does ease the pain / lol

9.5

Delectable Wine Delectable Pro

Follow to learn about our favorite wines & people.

I was very lucky to be introduced to the wines of Bruno Giacosa when the Maestro was at his peak and the wines were largely unknown to all but the most diehard Italian wine lovers. My dad always had a gleam in his eye when he brought a bottle of Giacosa Barolo or Barbaresco home for dinner. I remember paying $55 a bottle for the 1989 Santo Stefano Riserva upon release. It was the most I had ever spent on a bottle of wine for myself. I was not disappointed, let's leave it at that. When I started writing about wine professionally, I began having access to a lot of great wines from all over the world. As a wine writer and critic, it is easy to accept the many invitations to tastings and dinners that inevitably arrive, and to live off the largesse of others. But I never wanted to be a freeloader, so, although I could not afford the wines my friends liked to drink, I always brought the best I had. Often, they were Bruno Giacosa Red Labels from the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. And you know what? Those wines never let me down, even in the company of established benchmarks. I remember one dinner that paired the 1989 Haut-Brion with Giacosa’s 1989 Barbaresco Santo Stefano Riserva. Just two of us, and we drank both bottles, plus a bunch of other things, with great joy. What a night that was. The 1998 Bruno Giacosa Barolo Le Rocche del Falletto was a current release in 2003/2004 when I started putting together Piedmont Report, which remains the only newsletter ever written focused only on the wines of Piedmont. I am still paying off my student loans from MIT because I could not resist the 1998 Rocche at Marty’s in Allston when it was on sale. Either that, or Ian McFadden, now at Crush Wine & Spirits, is a great salesperson. Now, fifteen years later, the 1998 is in its early plateau of maturity. With beguiling aromatics and its mid-weight structure, the 1998 is sublime on this night. A year or so later, in 2005, Bob Parker asked me to join him at The Wine Advocate. At first I politely declined, as I wanted to be on my own, but a year later, with a young family a central part of my life, I accepted. (Antonio Galloni, Vinous, May 2018)

I was very lucky to be introduced to the wines of Bruno Giacosa when the Maestro was at his peak and the wines were largely unknown to all but the most diehard Italian wine lovers. My dad always had a gleam in his eye when he brought a bottle of Giacosa Barolo or Barbaresco home for dinner. I remember paying $55 a bottle for the 1989 Santo Stefano Riserva upon release. It was the most I had ever spent on a bottle of wine for myself. I was not disappointed, let's leave it at that. When I started writing about wine professionally, I began having access to a lot of great wines from all over the world. As a wine writer and critic, it is easy to accept the many invitations to tastings and dinners that inevitably arrive, and to live off the largesse of others. But I never wanted to be a freeloader, so, although I could not afford the wines my friends liked to drink, I always brought the best I had. Often, they were Bruno Giacosa Red Labels from the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. And you know what? Those wines never let me down, even in the company of established benchmarks. I remember one dinner that paired the 1989 Haut-Brion with Giacosa’s 1989 Barbaresco Santo Stefano Riserva. Just two of us, and we drank both bottles, plus a bunch of other things, with great joy. What a night that was. The 1998 Bruno Giacosa Barolo Le Rocche del Falletto was a current release in 2003/2004 when I started putting together Piedmont Report, which remains the only newsletter ever written focused only on the wines of Piedmont. I am still paying off my student loans from MIT because I could not resist the 1998 Rocche at Marty’s in Allston when it was on sale. Either that, or Ian McFadden, now at Crush Wine & Spirits, is a great salesperson. Now, fifteen years later, the 1998 is in its early plateau of maturity. With beguiling aromatics and its mid-weight structure, the 1998 is sublime on this night. A year or so later, in 2005, Bob Parker asked me to join him at The Wine Advocate. At first I politely declined, as I wanted to be on my own, but a year later, with a young family a central part of my life, I accepted. (Antonio Galloni, Vinous, May 2018)

Giuseppe Rudi

Flawed

Flawed

6.1

Andrew Steffensmeier Delectable Pro

This bottle tastes a little long in the tooth. Still tons of mature flavors dancing around.

This bottle tastes a little long in the tooth. Still tons of mature flavors dancing around.

9.3

Jean-Philip Journeault

1998

1998

9.3

Randy Windham

Hello. Pure genius! 1998 Giacosa Barolo Falletto. Fantastic with braised beef, polenta and broccoli. 14% abv.

Hello. Pure genius! 1998 Giacosa Barolo Falletto. Fantastic with braised beef, polenta and broccoli. 14% abv.

9.6

Brennan Anderson

Getting into some 98...popped and poured...still young, not as great as the 96s...

Getting into some 98...popped and poured...still young, not as great as the 96s...

9.7

Location

  • 606A West 28th Street
    New York, NY 10001

  • Hours:
    Monday-Friday: 11am-8pm
    Saturday: 12pm-6pm