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Louis Jadot Domaine Gagey Les Drazeys Chambolle-Musigny Pinot Noir 2015

$89.99

The French Revolution separated the great vineyards of Burgundy from the Benedictine and Cistercian monks that had cultivated them for centuries, and put them in the hands of the petite bourgeoisie of Paris and Dijon. Combined with the Napoleonic inheritance laws that compelled a split of assets between all children, this would result in the complicated web of vineyard plots that constitute modern Burgundy. With a multitude of disinterested Parisians owning a few vines in the Cote d'Or as their birthright, négociant houses like Jadot rose to aggregate their fruit and bring it to the world.

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Ratings on Delectable

Connor Smith

The French Revolution detonated everything about the old order of France, and wine was no exception - far from it. The great vineyards of Burgundy, that had been tended to and ached over by Benedictine and Cistercian monks for centuries, were confiscated and auctioned off to the petite bourgeoisie in Paris and Dijon. The Napoleonic inheritance code, which guaranteed an even split between all children, led to these ancient plots being further divided up with each passing generation. It wasn't long before there was a multitude of disinterested Parisians who owned a few vines in the Cote d'Or as their birthright. Négociant houses, such as Louis Jadot, popped up to make deals with these small landholders, aggregate their scattered plots, and bring their wine to the world. Modern Burgundy is still very much a reflection of its transformation during the Revolution, with some of the world’s most famous and valuable land portioned out into tiny parcels. It’s no wonder demand outstripped supply long ago! (This is adapted from notes for Le Dû’s Wines ‘History of Wine 1453AD-Present’ seminar, where this wine was poured)

The French Revolution detonated everything about the old order of France, and wine was no exception - far from it. The great vineyards of Burgundy, that had been tended to and ached over by Benedictine and Cistercian monks for centuries, were confiscated and auctioned off to the petite bourgeoisie in Paris and Dijon. The Napoleonic inheritance code, which guaranteed an even split between all children, led to these ancient plots being further divided up with each passing generation. It wasn't long before there was a multitude of disinterested Parisians who owned a few vines in the Cote d'Or as their birthright. Négociant houses, such as Louis Jadot, popped up to make deals with these small landholders, aggregate their scattered plots, and bring their wine to the world. Modern Burgundy is still very much a reflection of its transformation during the Revolution, with some of the world’s most famous and valuable land portioned out into tiny parcels. It’s no wonder demand outstripped supply long ago! (This is adapted from notes for Le Dû’s Wines ‘History of Wine 1453AD-Present’ seminar, where this wine was poured)

9.5

James Cahill

'15 Jadot sampling

'15 Jadot sampling

Location

  • 600 Washington St.
    New York, NY 10014

  • Hours:
    Mon-Fri. 10-8
    Sat. 11-8
    Sun. Closed

WARNING: DRINKING DISTILLED SPIRITS, BEER, COOLERS, WINE AND OTHER ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES MAY INCREASE CANCER RISK, AND, DURING PREGNANCY, CAN CAUSE BIRTH DEFECTS.